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Sorry I haven't been around lately....I would like to thank you all for all the support
that you showed me...it is appreciated...

This week, I'll start uploading new works, hopefully one a day, so stay tuned :)

Cheers
George
I would like to wish you all a happy new year and a big thank you for all your support :hug:
:bulletblack: The following interview was published in Press 1 magazine www.leafscape.org/press1/v6n1/…

:bulletblack: Full name:

Liz Cohn

:bulletblack: Date of birth:

May 1962

:bulletblack: What is your current location:

Portland, Oregon

:bulletblack: Tell us a little about the art styles that you use:

I create collage, mixed media, painting and assemblage and I like to randomly combine things that when thrown together bring up all sorts of hints and suggestions for alternate meanings. Then I noodle with them and draw out more connections. Most of the time the connections are visual and not thematic. I like to think of my work as Abstract Expressionist, but it is often a bit surreal. I am happy to let the viewer create their own stories for my work.

:bulletblack: What are your tools of trade:

Paper, found used items from garage sales, glue, paint, wood, playing cards

:bulletblack: Why did you choose these art styles:

I started as a painter, but a friend had to live in my art studio for 9 months and collage was something I could do at my kitchen table. Then there was no turning back form the delight of collage. Assemblage grew out of collage.

:bulletblack: What is your favorite one and why:

Collage comes more easily to me than assemblage. But good collage is hard to create. There are a lot of bad collages out there in the world, many of them mine. One of the best pieces I have made is 'Raven Lady 2' because it is so minimal and came together with two pieces.

:bulletblack: What other art styles would you like to experiment with:

I love encaustic painting. I took a class once, but blow torches scare me, I can't get over the feeling that they might explode in my face. I would like to find ways to incorporate encaustic into my collage work in a way not involving blow torches. I tried welding once, that was even scarier.

lucky by LizCohn wheel by LizCohn assemblage B by LizCohn

:bulletblack: What is your favorite art movement and why:

My favorite art movements are the ones that gave rise to Robert Rauschenberg and his 'Combines', so the intersections of Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. The 'Combines' for me are the pinnacle of art, they take my breath away. Well in addition to thinking Robert Rauschenberg was a god, I am very fond of Kurt Schwitters and Joan Mitchell. If I could create art that is some how a combination of these three artists, I would probably die happy.

I am also motivated by many of the artists from the Abstract Expressionist movement, minimalism, pop art and street art. The movements seem to have broken away from traditional rules and allow for a sense of pure joy in the act of creation and pleasure in the materials and tools of art.

:bulletblack: Who is your favorite artist and how do you connect with his/her works:

I have the pleasure of knowing one fantastic living collage artist, Eunice Parsons. She has been creating collage for over 50 years and at 95 still gets into her studio every day to create. Making collage gives her a reason to keep on living, that and kicking my butt at scrabble (euniceparsons.blogspot.com).

:bulletblack: What influenced you to become an artist:

I have always needed to make art but especially during down times.

:bulletblack: How long have you been an artist:

I have been exhibiting art for 25 years.

:bulletblack: How did your family and friends react of you being an artist:

My family do their best to support my art, but they don't really understand it. My friends are all artists and musicians and yogis- they don't really understand my family.

:bulletblack: Where do you get your inspiration from:

My inspiration comes from my friends and 12x16 gallery colleagues, and from the DeviantArt folks I have connected and collaborated with.

Descending Faces by LizCohn cavalia by LizCohn jewel thief by LizCohn feed me by LizCohn

:bulletblack: What can you tell us about your first collaboration:

What I love about DeviantArt are the people who are willing to collaborate on pieces with me. I really can't remember who I first collaborated with on the playing cards, but it was probably Richard Leach (RichardLeach ) or Laura Tringali Holmes (LauraTringaliHolmes) or Margaret Orr (hogret ) all whom have been delightful and inspiring collaborators.

:bulletblack: Can you tell us how collaborations influenced your art:

Collaborating lead me to start the 'Playing with a Full Deck' playing card collaboration. It has been going on for nearly 2 years and will have two shows in Oregon this winter and spring. Over 165 artists are involved with the project and there are over 1200 cards, so far. This project challenged me to explore my organizational skills. I have become the creator/spokesperson for this project. There is time to join up before the April deadline. And if you are connected to a medium sized gallery, I am still lining up exhibitions.

:bulletblack: Can you tell us how collaborations influenced you:

I learned to give up control of the outcome of a work that is the culmination of many artists.

:bulletblack: Do you promote/ sell/ showcase your artworks. If you do, how:

Nobody seems to buy my art on DeviantArt, but I do sell on Facebook : www.facebook.com/lizole and on my website: www.lizcohnartstudio.com

:bulletblack: What can you tell us about your current exhibition:

I am in the 'members show' at 12x16 Gallery in Portland, Oregon this December and January. 12x16 Gallery is a member directed gallery which features member works and guest artist works. The Dec-Jan. highlights two new works from each of the 13 members.

:bulletblack: Where can people visit your exhibition:

www.12x16gallery.com

:bulletblack: Where can people see your artworks:

www.lizcohnartstudio.com

:bulletblack: How can people contact you:

on DeviantArt: LizCohn
Facebook: www.facebook.com/lizole
or via my website: www.lizcohnartstudio.com

Tsunami 1 by LizCohn Tsunami 2 by LizCohn Tsunami 3 by LizCohn Tsunami 4 by LizCohn
:bulletblack: The following interview was published in LITnIMAGE magazine www.litnimage.com/martiniinter…

:bulletblack: Full name:

Luca Rossi

:bulletblack: Date of birth:

23 November 1971

:bulletblack: What is your current location:

Rome, Italy

:bulletblack: Tell us a little about the art styles that you use:

You start with a very difficult question... Perhaps my style can be summed up in the exact opposite of the word "art style", the lack of a real style is what characterizes my work. I like to wander among the various "artistic movements" and try different materials. Today I am fascinated by the surreal and the bizarre, with many science fiction contaminations, which I try to express through mediums that are more congenial to me. Probably someday I'll develop what others will consider my style, which will make my work recognizable both technically and in terms of content. For now I enjoy experimenting.

:bulletblack: What are your tools of trade:

I like working with pencils, ink, acrylics and oil. I am very traditional in this regard.

:thumb311492009: :thumb300851617: :thumb302671805:

:bulletblack: Why did you choose these art styles:  

I like surrealism because it goes beyond what we perceive with our five senses, is a tool that allows us to penetrate the daily life ...to boldly go where no man has gone before :)
The mere reproduction of what is real and tangible, in my personal opinion, is a little boring. For example: nature has worked for billions of years to create a tree, a tree today is perfect! No man will ever be able to do better, would not have the time. We can only reprocess it with a bit of imagination, and will be always a reproduction...Surrealism grants you the freedom to reinvent that tree, starting from zero, without the need to follow rules or absolute truths.

:bulletblack: What is your favorite one and why:  

Of course Surrealism and illustrated science fiction. Sometimes I really like to mix these two currents. The reason is related to the charm and wonder that struck me as a child when I saw the work of Dali, Ernst, Giger or science fiction books' illustrations. Sometimes I feel these sensations even today when I am a child of 40 years. :)

:bulletblack: What other art styles would you like to experiment with:

I'd like to try to draw comics in ink, which I consider art in all respects. This is another great passion of mine, but at the moment seems to be something beyond my skills. Maybe in the future.

:bulletblack: How can you define in your own word, surrealism:  

Break the rules.

:bulletblack: Who is your favorite artist and how do you connect with his/her works:

Karel Thole, a Dutch illustrator who has worked many years in Italy as a cover artist for the sci-fi magazine Urania. He was a true master of the fantastic and the surreal. I have an extensive collection of books illustrated by him from 60's up to 2000, year of his death. I miss his magic.

:thumb293457599: :thumb319296627: :thumb304447249:  :thumb296448105:

:bulletblack: What influenced you to become an artist:

I create because of the need to express myself and the pleasure of creating, and perhaps for the pleasure of surprising. But above all I am an "artist" because I like the challenge that a white paper throws you. I wrote artist in quotes because actually I am a clerk with a passion for art, not a professional artist. Well, I do not live with the earnings of my works, but the word artist has many different meanings...

:bulletblack: How long have you been an artist:

As a passionate amateur I have been an Artist my entire lifetime.

:bulletblack: How did your family and friends react of you being an artist:

My family has always been very pleased with my artistic skills and they always encouraged me.  Today more than ever I am supported by BK, my life partner and best friend.

:bulletblack: Where do you get your inspiration from:  

Everything inspires me: a photo, a phrase, a dream, a book, works of other artists, news or daily gossip... Sources are endless; you just need to know how to extract a work from them. Sometimes, when I'm in creative crisis, I read a sentence from any book, and reverse it. Et voilà! An image with unexpected meanings is born and it is developed. Very funny.

:bulletblack: What determined you to do collaborations:

Curiosity and the desire to learn and compare with other artists determined me to do collaborations. It was love at first sight. I did not think that it would be so funny, instructive and motivational! I am now in a very productive phase, only thanks to the fantastic fellows I have met since doing collaborations. Collaborations are the best thing that could have happen to me, they rekindled the desire to create. Thank you mates!

:thumb300974332: :thumb214440056: :thumb315616816:

:bulletblack: What can you tell us about your first collaboration:

I made my first collaboration with Immy (Immy-is-Thinking ) and I was struck by her incredible technique and imagination. It was nice to finish her drawing, but also hard. It was a very constructive experience.

:bulletblack: Can you tell us how collaborations influenced you and your art:

They have a heavy influence on my work and on my way to work, you can understand many things by looking at the drawings of other artists, even more true if you have to work on those drawings. Is quite a responsibility, but it is also a fun way to learn new styles and techniques.

:bulletblack: Do you promote your artworks:

I promote my work through the sites DeviantArt and Shadowness.

:bulletblack: How the internet did influence your art:

Internet is the world in your own home, it is impossible not to be influenced by a tool with a potential so vast. Is a revolution, even in the artistic field.

:bulletblack: Where can people see your artworks:

on DeviantArt lucarossimartini.deviantart.co… , on Shadowness shadowness.com/Lucarduca ...and in my living room!

:bulletblack: How can people contact you:  

They can contact me through my mail lucarduca71@hotmail.it  

:thumb283393383: :thumb275799346: :thumb272016217: :thumb272016636:
:bulletblack: Full name:

Adrian M. Jugaru

:bulletblack: Date of birth:

30 November 1985

:bulletblack: What is your current location:

Focsani, Romania

:bulletblack: Tell us a little about the art styles that you use:

I do collages, both traditional, the "glue-paper-scissors" way, and digital. I do some assemblage too, but I'm not that productive in that area. I tend to use a mixture of styles, I can't pick something specifically, it depends on what I'm doing. I guess lines and boxes are a constant in my work, I use those to emphasis different characteristics that connect to desire, mood and feelings.  From that point of view, I suppose expressionism is the art style that I use the most.

:bulletblack: What are your tools of trade:

When working on traditional collages I like to get dirty, literally. I use a bunch of inks, paint and shoe-polish on different types of paper, cardboard, wood. Also, on my assemblage pieces I really like using old rusted wire, glass-papier, all kind of metal pieces, string, pretty much anything that suits my idea. On digital collages my weapon of choice is Photoshop.

Stress free by jugadi The way to her heart is through her brain by jugadi Artificial happiness by jugadi Workaholic by jugadi

:bulletblack: Why did you choose these art styles:

Doing collages is fun, I love mixing up different elements and looking at the final result, but I do want my art to have a meaning, I want it to be food for brain, not just entertainment. Collages are tiny pieces of my soul, I use whatever suits the best what I'm trying to express.

:bulletblack: What is your favorite one and why:

Expressionism, camouflaged in minimalism, abstract and all sorts of styles is the way I manage to keep a balance between positive and negative feelings that boil inside me every day.

:bulletblack: What other art styles would you like to experiment with:

Pop art and pointillism sure are fun and catchy, I would like to give those a serious try some day. There are times when I'd love to be able to paint and, here, I'd choose impressionism.

:bulletblack: What is your favorite art movement and why:

I'm having trouble every time I have to pick favorites, I can't stop just at one. I'll have to say that I enjoy Minimalism, Bauhaus and Harlem Renaissance. They all work for me, they're lively, unforeseeable, powerful and the effect on me is similar to a can of Red Bull, only stronger.

:bulletblack: How can you define in your own word, expressionism:

Expressionism is, as I view it, a giant claw that sits quiet besides you and, when least expected, rips off your chest, extracts the feeling inside, turns them into balls of energy and hits the paper with them.

I'm right by jugadi A matter of choice by jugadi Don't let me be misunderstood 2 by jugadi

:bulletblack: Who is your favorite artist and how do you connect with his/her works:

Once again with the favorite. There are just too many great artists to choose from. I like the meticulous nature of Kandinsky, the rich and glamorous Hundertwasser and Basquiat, the visions of Max Ernst. However, I suppose I'll have to choose Francisco Goya as my favorite artist, especially in the "Black paintings" period. It's that mixture of pure, raw feelings that came out as paintings that intrigue me that is what I aim for, that is, for me, the supreme definition of art.

:bulletblack:  What influenced you to become an artist:

My mother used to write poetry when she was younger and my father puts together some great assemblage-like projects, for household use, so I guess it's in my DNA. Before assemblages I used to write, I still do it, not as much as I would like to, though. I suppose collages are the next step in my artistic part of life and I think this is what suits me best. Seeing some great artists' work has also boosted my desire to start creating. Still, I just do art to express my feelings, I find myself to be a volcano and the collages come out as lava.

:bulletblack: How long have you been an artist:

I've been experimenting collages for about two years, I used to do some now and then, but I've been working harder for about 9 months or so.

:bulletblack: How did your family and friends react of you being an artist:

I've had a bunch of reactions regarding my collages, ranging from "what is this again?" and "so..what are you going to do with all that stuff?" to "I'm really proud of what you're doing" and "keep on the good job". As I keep doing them and, hopefully, getting better at it, I get support from both family and friends.

Ha! What a great idea! by jugadi   Not the smell of success by jugadi Time eating sickness by jugadi Buddha in angst by jugadi

:bulletblack: Where do you get your inspiration from:

I guess I'm lucky enough to find inspiration in almost anything, from music to books, from chatting with friends to the rumor of the street. Also, seeing other artists' pieces works too. Sometimes I feel like thunder-struck and do something out of the blue, I like those works the best.

:bulletblack: What determined you to do collaborations:

Collaborations are fun and exciting; I love to do stuff like that. I got to thank "The Art of Collage" for introducing me this type of teamwork; it is here where I started doing this by taking part to the "Collaborative corpse" contest. You get to merge two types of thinking so it can become one, it's a great process.

:bulletblack: What can you tell us about your first collaboration:

It was a great pleasure and an honor for me to work with a great collage artist, Laura Tringali Holmes. The project was for us to work on half of the canvas without seeing what the other did, so the element of surprise was a big factor here. The great part about this is when revealing the partner's side of work and seeing the finished piece, it really puts a smile on your face.

:bulletblack: Can you tell us how collaborations influenced your art:

I still work on my personal style without getting too much influence from other artists. I was said to be perceptive, when collaborating I try not to enforce my style. I would rather compromise for the sake of a unitary finished look of the project. The art of collaborations lies in the art of compromise, that is if the two collaborators have different art styles. The perfect collaboration is when two minds think alike.

Little thumb by jugadi Destroying Rome by jugadi Start building Rome...now! by jugadi Habeas corpus by jugadi

:bulletblack: Do you promote/ sell/ showcase your artworks. If you do, how:

I'll be having my first exhibition later this month in Bucharest, I hope to get quite a crowd there. Meanwhile I use different sites to promote my artwork. I'm working on my etsy account and also on a romanian site for sales. They both should be ready in March. Until then, my facebook account and my e-mail address can be used for purchasing my artwork.

:bulletblack: How the internet did influence your art:

Regarding my artworks, internet spells resources for me. From different pictures I use, (there are some great free-stock providers on deviantart), to ideas I get, people I meet, internet is a great help. Also, it has been almost an exclusive way to promote my work.

:bulletblack: Where can people see your artworks:

Besides jugadi.deviantart.com/ , my work can be seen on my personal blog, adrian-jugaru.blogspot.com/ and on different other art sites and blogs.

:bulletblack: How can people contact you:  

jugadi@gmail.com or www.facebook.com/jugaru.colaje

Introspection by jugadi The flowers of conformity by jugadi Romeo and Juliet by jugadi
:bulletblack: The following interview was published in Synchronized Chaos magazine synchchaos.com/?m=201204

:bulletblack: Full name:

Marc Joseph Gosselin

:bulletblack: Date of birth:

May 6, 1967

:bulletblack: What is your current location:

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

:bulletblack: Tell us a little about the art styles that you use:

Due to the fact I'm a medical and scientific illustrator I deal with high realism. Since our illustrations are used for teaching purposes, the subjects we are illustrating have to be represented accurately and in detail. On my time off I like to explore surrealism. It allows me to relax and at the same time keeps my drawing arm warmed up and ready to tackle whatever contract comes my way.

:bulletblack: What are your tools of trade:

The prismacolor pencils are my tools of choice. They are oilier than most color pencils and blend beautifully with the help of some mineral spirits. Best of all you don't have to worry about the mess one usually deals with when using paints, pastels, and charcoal, just to name a few. When I want to draw something detailed in black and white I sometimes use carbon dust, which gives wonderful results. The computer and photoshop of course, are also a wonderful and necessary tool.

Cholecystectomy by marcgosselin Mastectomy by marcgosselin Endarterectomy by marcgosselin

:bulletblack: Detail a little more the talk about realism:

It is necessary when you are a medical and scientific illustrator to be proficient in realism. For example when we are illustrating a surgical procedure all the nerves as well as arteries and veins have to be in their proper location in relation to the incision and organs being represented, otherwise the students viewing our illustrations may be misled, because ultimately our illustrations are used for teaching purposes, and the details have to be accurate.

:bulletblack: What is your favorite style and why:

Surrealism is my favorite, because I don't have to be as serious with the outcome, as my pieces which deal with realism. I can relax and have fun, and at the same time keep my drawing arm well oiled.

:bulletblack: What other art styles would you like to experiment with:

For the moment I am very content with realism and surrealism. I was never really found of the abstract, but who knows maybe someday.

:bulletblack: How can you define in your own word, surrealism:

Surrealism is like an explosion of ideas on paper, and at the moment I am being mentored by one of the best surrealists in the field, Bernard Dumaine.

Jacques Cousteau by marcgosselin Native American by marcgosselin MONGOLIAN by marcgosselin Asian man by marcgosselin

:bulletblack: Who is your favorite artist and how do you connect with his/her works:

There are so many amazing artists out there that I admire, it would be very difficult for me to choose one in particular.

:bulletblack: What influenced you to become an artist:

It seemed to be the natural course of events since I've been drawing for as long as I can remember.

:bulletblack: How long have you been an artist:

I've been an artist for as long as I could hold a pencil. My parents had me while they were students at Cornel University, and there was not much money to go around, so the only toys I had as a young child were color pencils and a pad of paper. I started being a professional artist when I was 17, and still in high school. The father of my girlfriend at the time was a doctor of neuroanatomy who was writing a book on the subject, and invited me to illustrate his textbook. He also introduced me to a program called Biomedical communications which was given at the University of Toronto's department of surgery. I subsequently graduated with honors and I've been a medical and scientific illustrator ever since.

:bulletblack: How did your family and friends react of you being an artist:

My parents were happy to see me follow my dream, and supported me all the way. They are very proud of my work, and are my best critics.

:bulletblack: Where do you get your inspiration from:

My environment, and other artists work inspire me. When I'm working on my medical illustrations it's more accuracy than inspiration that is needed, yet when I deal with surrealism I get a chance to put my hair down and truly be inspired by whatever comes to mind.

Soul Collector's son by marcgosselin You Put A Spell On Me by marcgosselin Thinking Out Loud by marcgosselin Releasing Lady Hawk, contrast by marcgosselin

:bulletblack: What determined you to do collaborations:

As soon as I was introduced to the exquisite corpse and saw all the magnificent collaborations I knew I wanted to participate. At the moment I'm collaborating with several amazing artists.

:bulletblack: What can you tell us about your first collaboration:

It was nerve wracking because I did not want to ruin the illustration started by the artist I was collaborating with. When I begin a collaborative corpse I can be relaxed, but completing one is a whole different story. I believe I will always feel that way because of the enormous responsibility that comes with completing somebody else's work.

:bulletblack: Can you tell us how collaborations influenced you and your art:

It has opened up a whole new way of expressing myself without any restrictions through my art.

:bulletblack: How the internet did influence your art:

Through DeviantArt I met wonderful illustrators including Bernard Dumaine who introduced me to the exquisite corpse, also known as exquisite cadaver (from the original French term "cadavre exquis") or rotating corpse. It is a method by which a collection of images is collectively assembled. Each collaborator adds to a composition in sequence, by being allowed to see the edge of what the previous person contributed. The resulting image is spectacular and surreal.

:bulletblack: Where can people see your artworks: My work can be seen on DeviantArt.

:bulletblack: How can people contact you: Through DeviantArt.

Tiger in jungle by marcgosselin Wolf Pack, closeup by marcgosselin Tree Frog Combo by marcgosselin
:bulletblack: The following interview was published in LITnIMAGE magazine www.litnimage.com/winter2012.h…

Full name:

Martin de Diego Sadaba

Date of birth:

Any moment three decades ago

What is your current location:

Bilbao / Spain

Tell us a little about the art styles that you use:

I develop different kind of works, I do concept, classical illustration and portraits for commissions but my personal works flows between fantasy and dark surrealism. I'm opened to many things it's hard for me to find a personal line of work or a personal style, maybe my personal strokes would define my style.

Why did you choose these art styles:

It's how when you are hungry and you open the fridge, you know exactly what your stomach wants to taste. I develop "my styles" because it's what feeds my hunger.

Factory 2.0 by AlMaNeGrA Factory 1.2 by AlMaNeGrA Psychic decay portrait by AlMaNeGrA IMPACT by AlMaNeGrA

How can you define in your own word, surrealism:

Intuition speech is the best definition I could find.

What influenced you to become an artist and how did your family/friend react to the idea:

Like someone said. When we are children we all draw, but most of us stop to draw at a moment. I'm one of those children that never stopped, so I never became an artist, I just continued drawing. Because I always drew, my family and friends got used to it, so they never had the chance to react any way haha

How long have you been an artist:

As a professional artist for more than a decade, too much for my poor quality, enough to be double better than how I'm.

Where do you get your inspiration from:

I get my inspiration from my dreams, from fantasy, philosophy, drugs and Deviantart.

Technification by AlMaNeGrA The strange place by AlMaNeGrA

What determined you to do collaborations:

I'm an energetic vampire when working. I have double the energy to do whatever if I work in a group and I believe in what I do.

What can you tell us about your first collaboration:

I could say that I don't remember exactly what it was. I can only remember that some of my first ones were Exquisite Corpses between Ton Haring, Bernard Dumaine and me. I remember that I experienced strong feelings, loving them and partially hating them (my collaborations, not my partners) in some way, but mostly experiencing a heavy surprise at the end. Actually when I do collaborations, both of us (me and my collaborator) work together through all the process, so it is a very different thing than the exquisite corpse experience. Actually it's more like a studio work, depending on the person with who you work on the collaboration.

Can you tell us how collaborations influenced you and your art:

Some of my collaborations gave me the chance to meet people that today are my friends and fellow artists. Collaborations are the best resource ever to learn, share and help each other, and also collaborations are a good training for working in groups.

How the internet did influence your art:

I live through internet, the simplest question would be "how the internet DID NOT influence my art. But anyway I have no answer. :D

What can you tell us about your current exhibition:

My current exhibition will be a series of collective exhibition with my partners that can be seen at /www.hystericalminds.com and it will be ready soon, for early 2012.

Where can people see your artworks: almanegra.deviantart.com and I'm working on my personal portfolio already but it's not finished.

How can people contact you: mdsadaba@gmail.com

Golden Age by AlMaNeGrA the challenger of death by AlMaNeGrA scream of the gargoyle by AlMaNeGrA Lich Master by AlMaNeGrA
:bulletblack: Full name:

Jean Edvard Derkert

:bulletblack: Date of birth:

19 June 1954

:bulletblack: What is your current location:

Stockholm. Sweden

:bulletblack: Tell us a little about the art styles that you use:

Many – I don't believe in style. At least not one style. Some of my art looks surreal, some pieces are abstract, others border to dada or satire. Chance, the current material I am using, and what mood I am in, determine the outcome. Some pieces look like collages, others look like painting and drawings.

:bulletblack: What are your tools of trade:

I use a Mac Book Pro, a camera and  a Wacom board. Sorry to be so boring! Sometimes when working outside the computer I use anything that comes along: for example when I make small objects/assemblages.

life forms nr 2 by derkert Creativity part 2 by derkert Figures in color by derkert Creativity by derkert Kind of blue by derkert

:bulletblack: What other art styles would you like to experiment with:

My first style was scribbling. The free expression of the child. Joy in colors and lines. I liked it more than others. My school books were full of drawings. Teachers complained, I didn't pay attention. Then later on, some  of my teachers were enthusiastic. Guilt by association I guess, because at that time my relative, Siri Derkert, was a very famous artist in Sweden. She had a very attractive rough drawing style that was easy to mimic. That was my second style. Not that different from my original one.  In 1966 everything changed with The Beatles' album Revolver. The album cover was a mix of drawing and collage. What a revelation.

The first "real" artist I encountered  and liked was Emil Nolde, the German expressionist. For a short period I was into Salvador Dali. The standard  surrealist teenage crush. Then Matisse, Warhol, Kline, Van Meer, Rauschenberg, Van Gogh, Max Ernst etc  etc . Mixed up confusion, and why not. I tried many  styles, but felt no need to be faithful to any. What I did choose was the collage. First papier collé, just paper and glue. My second choice was to leave traditional collage behind and go digital. Collage is still my most important means of expressing myself visually. Collage is not a style and can differ a lot. Collage is not merely a technique. It is a way of  thinking.


:bulletblack: What is your favorite art movement and why:

The one I like the most is Dada, maybe not esthetically, but because of the irrepressible Dada spirit. The humor,  the irreverence , the  plain stupidity. But even better is Kurt Schwitters' own Dada movement Merz. Kurt Schwitters had no style, besides from doing his collages he painted very traditional landscapes.  

Many a man has learned... by derkert Thrilling details needed by derkert total baldness by derkert

:bulletblack: Who is your favorite artist and how do you connect with his/her works:

If I have to choose one artist it has to be the above mentioned Kurt Schwitters. His work is a
bit uneven, but when he hits the nail on the head sparks really fly. He was , just like me, a jack of all trades. Quite well known for his writing; collage like poetry and absurd short stories. He was also working with graphic design. In many ways I feel a great affinity for the man and artist Kurt Hermann Eduard Karl Julius Schwitters. We even share the christian  name Eduard.

:bulletblack: What influenced you to become an artist:

I have always loved art, but music is my real love. When I realized I could not cut it as a jazz player, I once again turned my interest towards art and collage. I decided to be a professional artist when a major Swedish newspaper started to use my collages.

:bulletblack: How long have you been an artist:

I have been a professional for about twenty years now.

:bulletblack: How did your family and friends react to you being an artist:

I was quite old then and I can't remember any comments at all. I guess no one was surprised.

:bulletblack: Where do you get your inspiration from:

"You can find inspiration in everything – and if you can't look again." Great title of a book by designer Paul Smith

Thrill Ride by derkert Being abstract by derkert The roll out by derkert

:bulletblack: What can you tell us about your current exhibition:

My last exhibition this spring was a real "collage like" show based on words and pictures from a few copies of Popular Mechanics from 1948. I printed a little booklet called "Smashing Champion Secrets". I have also published a book called "Cut & Paste" written by me and Kathtin Diestel. These books can be ordered on: dad.a.se/lim/ . The texts in the book can also be found on cutandpaste.in/ .

:bulletblack: Where can people visit your exhibition:

I am engaged in an artist driven gallery called Nationalgalleriet (www.nationalgalleriet.just.nu/ ). I exhibit there on a regular basis.


:bulletblack: Where can people see your artworks:

On the internet, on my webpage: edvardderkert.com or on DeviantArt: derkert.deviantart.com/

:bulletblack: How the internet did influence your art:

The big change for me was the social art forum DeviantArt.  I have had a home page for years – but with DeviantArt all of a sudden I get lots of feedback and I now have a sort of "audience" I can address.  I have made a lot of friends – some of them I met in real life, too. One of the good things with DeviantArt is that it made me take my making art more seriously. I see so many great works of art on DeviantArt that it inspires me to try harder and now that I have lots of people watching my work I only want to put up my best works of art.

:bulletblack: How can people contact you:

edvard@dad.a.se

worship by derkert   Mothership by derkert Sort of Picabia by derkert
:bulletblack: Full name:  

Dr. Imogen Smith.  But really… No-one ever calls me Imogen… even my boss calls me Immy

:bulletblack: Date of birth:  

27 May 1976

:bulletblack: What is your current location:  

England

:bulletblack: Tell us a little about the art styles that you use:  

I am not sure how to answer that.  Honestly, I’m not.  I am not very educated in art or how you define different styles of it.  Maybe surreal and abstract are styles I aspire to but that covers a lot really doesn’t it?

:bulletblack: What are your tools of trade:

A brain, some thoughts, some dreams, lots of pencils, paints, glue, scissors, magazine cuttings, a camera, a scanner, a computer… anything that doesn’t get away…

:bulletblack: Why did you choose these art styles:  

Because in my head they make sense.  I am not good at articulating these kinds of things.

Serotonin Sump by Immy-is-Thinking A Wandering Mind by Immy-is-Thinking Lilly-putians by Immy-is-Thinking :thumb191025288:

:bulletblack: What is your favorite one and why:

I love to draw things that fall out of my mind.  If surrealism is about liberating thoughts and associations from your head without worrying if the result is technically possible or accurate, then that is my favorite style.

:bulletblack: What other art styles would you like to experiment with:  

Realism.  I would like to have the concentration and focus to draw or paint something real as it actually looks, but I don’t have that talent.  

:bulletblack: How can you define in your own word, surrealism:  

I am not sure I would try.  Maybe see the answer above… I guess to me at least it’s about letting your brain do the talking, but I don’t know, maybe a more art educated surrealist might disagree :D

:bulletblack: Who is your favorite artist and how do you connect with his/her works:  

Too many.  If I had to choose an artist from a gallery whose images moved my mind I would choose Yves Tanguay.  If I can’t get lost in front of some of his paintings I don’t know where I can.  They seem full of space but having lots of things in, but not crowded.

:thumb164794829: :thumb203953454: :thumb164682109: :thumb187748939:

:bulletblack: What influenced you to become an artist:

My father taught me to paint and draw when I was 4.  After he was gone I carried on painting and drawing.  And when I was at secondary school I was one of the weird kids.  I used to stay in the art room at lunch time and became great friends with my art teacher, from who I learned next to nothing about the technicalities or academics of art, but everything about just *painting* and just *drawing*... that my technical skill is not as important as it making me happier.

:bulletblack: How long have you been an artist:  

Well… I don’t feel so much like an artist… my whole life maybe I don’t know!  What do you mean by artist? I am a scientist for my job.  If you mean how long have I been messing up the house with pencils and paints and stuff, since I was very young and my parents let me paint and draw with everything on everything.  Although my mum says she did take exception to me mixing baby powder with petroleum jelly and painting the sofa.  That would be art if you sold it right…

:bulletblack: How did your family and friends react of you being an artist:

My father taught me and I think he would rather I was an artist than a scientist!! My mum and my sister try to nick all my paintings and drawings.

:bulletblack: Where do you get your inspiration from:  

My head, my lab, your brain, other peoples brains, brain cells under a microscope, creatures in the sea, sea slugs, plants in my garden, food, the weather… but I don’t have much time to paint and draw… so my head and my notebooks are always swimming with ideas that never make it to life.

Mature Content

The Seeds of Dimension by Immy-is-Thinking
:thumb169544734: Minerealisations... by Immy-is-Thinking

:bulletblack: What determined you to do collaborations:

You mean corpse-type collaboration? Because it was inspiring when I tried it so I had to carry on :D

:bulletblack: What can you tell us about your first collaboration:

My first collaborative corpse type collaboration was with Neil Dring (knotty-inks on dA).  We were doing what was intended to be an open collaboration where two people each draw half of a face, inspired by the fact that I have chronic insomnia.  I drew with 6 other people who, either temporarily or chronically, couldn’t sleep.  Neil surprised me and sent me his half-face packaged up like a corpse so I couldn’t see most of it and completed it ‘blind’ so to speak.  Naughty knotty-inks, heheheh!  He started me off on this game… I’m so glad :D

:bulletblack: Can you tell us how collaborations influenced your art:  

They challenge me to think more and less consciously about drawing… more because half the time you are following someone else’s flow, half the time you are trying to leave them a clue to follow yours… so it’s not like anything can flop out of your head onto paper and cover it all.  Less because there is no point being too obsessive about a drawing when you don’t know what half of it is so you can just let your imagination out of its box.  It’s like mildly organizing your chaos ^_^

:bulletblack: Can you tell us how collaborations influenced you:  

They make me feel like a little piece of me can go anywhere in the world through a drawing.  Which is liberating.  And also makes me feel like a drawing can have a point.  Even if the point is just that two people make something.  

:thumb206851447: :thumb203866134: :thumb203546540: :thumb203546468:

:bulletblack:  Do you promote/ sell/ showcase your artworks. If you do, how:  

Sometimes I take commissions, mostly for painting glass.  It’s my hobby though so not much, not often.

:bulletblack: Where can people see your artworks:  

My house.  Feel  free to stop by for tea.  And some other people’s houses.  Better ask them before going for tea though…

:bulletblack: How the internet did influence your art:  

It opened up a whole GIANT world of seeing other peoples work and collaborating and exchanging ideas and advice and realizing there are quite a lot of other scientists and engineers and whoever else making art.  So I have met some amazing people and I feel very in awe of some other artists I meet online ^_^

:bulletblack: How can people contact you:

Via DA or immy@aerobang.co.uk

The Sad Brain Cell by Immy-is-Thinking :thumb185915135: :thumb180348073:
:bulletblack: Full name:

Eric Robinson

:bulletblack: What is your current location:  

Michigan, USA

:bulletblack: Tell us a little about the art styles that you use:

I suppose “found poetry” would be the big one and any other styles I use revolve around that. The words always come first for me, for any piece that I start, and are always the most important part of any composition. The rest can be broken down as such: 70% collage, 30% surrealism and 100,000% awesomeness.

:bulletblack: Why did you choose these art styles:

I don’t think I did, consciously anyway. Everything evolved on its own and still is. It’s an ever-changing process. I try not to think about what I’m doing when I’m making these. I just sit down and see what happens and I usually like the end result, so I guess that’s a good thing.

:thumb199206102: :thumb200971565: :thumb200983695: :thumb202454888:

:bulletblack: What are your tools of trade:

Office supplies, lots of sharpies, markers, crayons, scotch tape, whiteout, hole punch. And stacks of old paperbacks I pick up at a local book shop from the $.50 bin.

:bulletblack: Who is your favorite artist and how do you connect with his/her works:

Too hard to pick a single favorite, but here are a few that inspire me to keep creating: Basquiat, Rauschenberg, Rothko, Banksy, Motherwell, SAMO, Enem, Weegee, Mignola…

:bulletblack: What influenced you to become an artist:

I was influenced by other people’s art.

:bulletblack: How long have you been an artist:

I have been an artist for as long as I can remember, which is at least two years back.

:bulletblack: How did your family and friends react of you being an artist:

My friends and family didn’t react at all.

:thumb197833728: :thumb197676253: :thumb196073881: :thumb196832607:

:bulletblack: Where do you get your inspiration from:

I don’t like thinking about the creative process on any kind of surface level. Inspiration or creativity or whatever you want to call it is completely arbitrary and shapeless. Trying to control or understand such things usually leads to apprehension and doubt (for me anyway).  I feel like inspiration comes from somewhere intangible and to label that would be to cheapen the mystery of the creative experience. I like mysteries.

:bulletblack: Where can people visit your exhibition:

(Scene) Metrospace in East Lansing, Michigan. It runs through April 17th.

:bulletblack: What can you tell us about your current exhibition:  

It’s amazing and you should totally go.

:bulletblack: Where can people see your artworks:

giantshadows.deviantart.com

:bulletblack: How can people contact you:

giantshadows@yahoo.com

:thumb198141329: :thumb197653992: :thumb194534911: :thumb194919759:
:bulletblack: Full name:

Jenifer J. Renzel

:bulletblack: Date of birth:

July 1965

:bulletblack: What is your current location:

San Jose, California

:bulletblack: Tell us a little about the art styles that you use:

For whatever reason, I only like to use old stuff– Victorian era or older is best. I’ve been told that I have a Dada type style in which things fit together visually even though they might not otherwise make sense together. So, maybe I’m a Dada assemblage artist or a mixed-media artist from a different era.  
All I can say is that I spend lots of time holding things together to see if they look right. I’m constantly searching through my bins of junk looking for the right body or the right head or the right hat or whatever. I like to have several pieces going at the same time because sometimes it’s really hard to find just the right piece before I can continue.  I like to move on to another project when the inspiration hits, then move back to stalled projects.  Closure is hard. It’s hard to know when a piece is really done.

:bulletblack: What are your tools of trade:

First, I need the objects …  boxes, frames, dolls, toys, old, ratty books with pictures, rusted metal hardware, old, dirty fabric, stuff found on the beach and in the woods, and lots of uncategorizeable junk. Then the tools and supplies.  I use tons of hand tools … pliers, snipers, punches, bolt cutters, shears, hole punches, hammers, chisels, etc. For the supplies, lots of glues (epoxies and wood glues), wire, tiny screws and nails, tons of paints, crackle paint medium, collage medium, walnut stains, varnishes, dulling compounds, fimo, and various types of wood.

Assemblage: Skinny Legs by bugatha1 Segmented Man Assemblage by bugatha1 Cyclops Martian Assemblage by bugatha1 Assemblage:Human Crab Splice 1 by bugatha1 Big Hat Assemblage by bugatha1

:bulletblack: Why did you choose these art styles:  

I didn’t actively choose them … they’ve just come out as part of my personality. Before I was making assemblages, I was already digging around for old, weird stuff. I’ve always gravitated towards used junk, not sure why. I was introduced to assemblage by a couple good friends and fellow artists, one of whom has passed away (may she RIP). Once I started really making assemblages (maybe 5 years ago), I could tell I’d finally found what I wanted to do. I messed around with jewelry and some other sculptural styles before that, but they didn’t grab me the same way. I like making little worlds with weird old creatures that live in weird old little shrines/rooms/lodgings. I love it when I get a good idea for some creature or scene, then can actually go into my workroom and start to pull it together.

:bulletblack: What other art styles would you like to experiment with:

I’d like to try my hand at flat collages … I’d like to try to create the little worlds and scenes but on a flat plane …

:bulletblack: What is your favorite art movement and why:

I really enjoy surrealist artists such as Hieronymus Bosch  (www.boschbruegel.com/gallerybo…)  and Salvador Dali. I also love Alexander Calder’s circus (www.youtube.com/watch?v=t6jwnu…).

:bulletblack: Who is your favorite artist and how do you connect with his/her works:

I think many assemblage artists will tell you that Joseph Cornell (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_C…) is an inspiration. I feel the same way.

:bulletblack: What influenced you to become an artist:

Well, I am still faced with keeping up with my day job in order to pay the bills. I’ve always enjoyed art though – since I was able to pick up a crayon. It would be a dream if I could make enough money to do art full time, but I’m far from being able to accomplish that. My current thinking is that after I retire from my day job, I’ll start my second full time career as an artist.

Tiny assemblage: Extinct Fish by bugatha1 Tiny assemblage: Cat by bugatha1 Tiny assemblage: Crab 1 by bugatha1

:bulletblack: How long have you been an artist:

Seriously, only in the last 5 or 6 years. Less seriously, my whole life.

:bulletblack: Where do you get your inspiration from:

There are some great artists on Deviant. Just browsing about, I’ve come across folks such as: shards0fwords, PlayaFairy, GregPDX, RevolverWinds, EyeBallPingPongPro, and woefoep.  A lot of my inspirations come from just being present in my life.  I’ll see something in a magazine or in my surroundings or from a dream or a memory …. things just pop into my head. I carry a notebook and a pencil with me and scribble out rough pictures so I don’t lose the ideas. When I’m in my workshop and don’t have a current project, there’s always something in my notebook waiting to come to life. It’s fun to look back at the original rough drawing and compare it to the final output. Sometimes, there’s no drawing in the notebook – things just come together in the workshop and the whole planning step is skipped. This happens spontaneously – I see a weird head that happens to look really cool next to something that is lying out from a previous frenzy to find the right piece for some other project.

:bulletblack: Do you promote/ sell/ showcase your artworks. If you do, how:

I sell my works at the Kaleid gallery in downtown San Jose (www.kaleidgallery.com/ )

:bulletblack: How the internet did influence your art:

Deviant art has been a big influence. I get inspired looking at other people's work – even trading with other people or sharing tips and approaches.

:bulletblack: How can people contact you:

jjrenzel@gmail.com

Assemblage: Baby Head Clock by bugatha1 Assemblage: The Humunculus by bugatha1 Favorite Pet Assemblage by bugatha1 Assemblage: Clown Head Clock by bugatha1
:bulletblack: Full name:  

Mark Jon Erickson

:bulletblack: What is your current location:

I live and have painting studios in Oakland & Venice, California, but predominately paint in Oakland across the bay from San Francisco.

:bulletblack: Tell us a little about the art styles that you use:

I think of my work as traditional abstract painting. I slip in humorous aspects, with cartoonesque shapes enabling me a freedom to experiment with mixed media, collage and drawing to complete my work. My interests in literature, comics and music can be incorporated to their fullest potential with the style of painting.

Scurrying images and resurrected ideas from my past and notations of the present lead me to each new canvas. I want viewers to see things, experience a moment in my painting. Whether it something lyrical or an impact of color, shape and illusion I seek to keep the eye moving. Collage elements are added to take the painting into another arena.
The need to feel something that may not be there at first glance, but to know it is there someplace, obscured momentarily, reminiscent of a long gander into the void that one creates out of nothing.

When it comes to my paper collage work and Polaroid shooting, I take more of a graphic approach, tending to single out the piece and offer it less in a pretty way, but more in what happens in the process. It follow wherever the mood strikes me. I'd rather shoot buildings in my Polaroid work than people and in collage, I treat it like a dance with paper and imagery.

Accidents happen and those interesting spontaneous occurrences strike me the best. I follow that lead in my work. The moment counts and to strike while the iron is sizzling is my technique. You have to have courage to be a painter. Ideas you have now, however they maybe unappreciated by others and the critics at the time you are undertaking the work, will be the ideas you look back on that made you what you are in the future. Once I thought of a  tale where the painter is the last survivor, when the ship goes down in oblivion.

Telegraph Avenue by DocSonian Bloodline Brewery by DocSonian Transamerikan Pyramid Building by DocSonian

:bulletblack: Why did you choose these art styles:

I never chose, they choose me and I just know it is a natural journey. My grandmother and mother were painters and it just became a tradition in my family. The other direction was more structured from my father.
He taught me a lot about construction and building and tools and hard work. Between what the women in my family gave me and my father and grandfather's talents and advise, I took off from there.

My style of painting comes from the times I live in and the interests I have followed since I was a child. My influences are varied. Everything from things I see in the city streets to my own imagination when I am seeking inspiration to influence me. From Duchamp, Picasso and Matisse to DeKooning and all the great underground cartoonists have long ago shown me where to go.

:bulletblack: What is your favorite one and why:

My current work with painting on canvas. That is my goal, to paint the best paintings I can, with some kind of impact and color and make your eyes dance around the canvas.

:bulletblack: What other art styles would you like to experiment with:

I have tried every style you can imagine, from photo realism to landscape to color field painting and 3 dimensional painting. I feel what I am doing now is what I was meant to do. I often go back to techniques and styles I once did, ones I have passed over quickly and never fully delved into. It's all tools of the trade. Change is inevitable and something I seek. I just try and stay on course with what I am doing long enough to getsome good work out of it before I move on to other series of work. Change is inevitable.

Mercury Dime by DocSonian A Wait For Water by DocSonian The Gathering of Dust by DocSonian The Diver by DocSonian

:bulletblack: How long have you been an artist:

Since I was a child, drawing along side my grandmother in her New York City studio, and going along with her and my mother to museums and galleries. When I heard my Uncle Benjamin knew Marcel Duchamp back in the 1940s in New York City, that just reassured me into my chosen profession

:bulletblack: What influenced you to become an artist:

My mother and grandmother and the art that hung on the walls of our homes as I grew up in. Also the traveling around the world and the hundreds of museums and galleries I have visited. To me it was as natural to become an artist as it was to become anything. Art and music and film were my true interests ever since I was a child. Painting just seemed the course most natural after awhile.

:bulletblack: How did your family and friends react of you being an artist:

My mother was very pleased, my father the opposite. He grew into it as I became more successful and I think he realized I made the correct choices. Other members in my family had varied opinions over the years, both positive and negative that really had absolutely no affect on me. I believe my parents were the only ones I had anything to prove. Their approval meant a lot. I did not want to be the one to go back to them and say I made a mistake.

:bulletblack: Where do you get your inspiration from:  

Absolutely everything. It's a constant process. There are unlimited ideas floating around.

:bulletblack: What are your tools of trade:

In my painting these days I mostly paint in acrylics, latex, inks and collage. All water-based mediums.

The Crazies by DocSonian The Wild Bunch by DocSonian When Roseanne Barr Was In Town by DocSonian

:bulletblack: Do you live of your art or do you do your art as a hobby:

I have lived off my painting for nearly 20 years now. Nothing is easy, it takes work, concentration and some kind of professionalism. Knowledge of the market and a personality that can deal with many of the dilettantes you will meet on the way.

:bulletblack: Do you promote/ sell/ showcase your artworks. If you do, how:

I exhibit in galleries and once a year I promote an Open Studio where I invite collectors to my studio and present new work. I use the web to contact collector and dealers and present work on various sites.

:bulletblack: How did the internet influenced your art:

Not sure it has influenced my art much in the creation stand point, but definitely in sales and being able to show my work to more people than one can imagine.

:bulletblack: Where can people see your artworks:

On these sites:
My personal site www.markerickson.com
Tilt Paintings tinyurl.com/ericksonpaintings
Tilt Polaroids loathemegacorp.com/galleries/e…

In these books:
Shades on White - Works on Paper www.blurb.com/books/914607
Lone Star Floating - a book of Poems and Polaroids www.blurb.com/books/871486
NO DESOLATION - New Orleans after Katrina By Mark Erickson & Katy Zartl www.blurb.com/books/738760

I am represented in these galleries:
Robert Green Fine Arts - Mill Valley, California
Angela King Gallery - New Orleans, Louisiana
Donna Seager Gallery - San Rafael, California
Toomey Tourell Gallery - San Francisco, California
Marion Meyer Contemporary Arts - Laguna Beach, Ca.

:bulletblack: How can people contact you:

mark@markerickson.com

Eyes in Spiral Staircase by DocSonian Five Chances to Go by DocSonian The Devil's Elite Corp by DocSonian
:bulletblack: Full name:  

Bernard Dumaine

:bulletblack: Date of birth:  

August 20th, 1953

:bulletblack: What is your current location:

Angoulême, France

:bulletblack: Tell us a little about the art styles that you use:

My favorite art styles are Surrealism and Hyperrealism (or photorealism) and sometimes a mix of both styles...

:bulletblack: Why did you choose these art styles:

Since a young age, I always have liked realism in art, for me the pictorial representation of things or people owns something like magic. Abstract art was quite "à la mode " when I joined the fine art school where I studied, I felt rather embarrassed with that, or I should say few interested.... but I went back soon to the style I loved.

Grande Deusa by Bernardumaine The harbingers by Bernardumaine Le complicazioni by Bernardumaine 'Pillars of Consciousness' by Bernardumaine

:bulletblack: What is your favorite one and why:

I really love Surrealism; Photorealism can easily get boring, being sometimes only about technical skills.

:bulletblack: What other art styles would you like to experiment with:

I really don't know..."Avant-guarde", may be hahahah.

:bulletblack: How long have you been an artist:

I have been drawing since a very young age, but I began to draw and paint seriously around the age of 20.

:bulletblack: What influenced you to become an artist:

I have no real artistic ground in my family, although my father was skilled with ink drawings. He produced only a few, but I still remember a very beautiful drawing in ink which he did using as a model the church of the small town he was living in. My mother was very supportive, she enrolled me in drawing classes an afternoon a week  from the age of 11 to 15. These lessons certainly gave me good bases for further steps...

Batailles by Bernardumaine Il sottoscritto e servito by Bernardumaine Sweet Abyss by Bernardumaine

:bulletblack: How did your family and friends react of you being an artist:

My family has always been very supportive, my parents never otherwise prevented me from doing from what I loved, even for something more lucrative, I think they felt that I was needing to create to be happy.

:bulletblack: Where do you get your inspiration from:  

I like to work from photographs, I painted or drew ordinary people or landscapes some time ago...but, the main part of my work comes from my imagination.

:bulletblack: What are your tools of trade:

I enjoyed a lot of techniques, from oils to video, my favorite tool still being the pencil.

:bulletblack: Do you live of your art or do you do your art as a hobby:

Although I don't make a living with my art, I am registered as a professional artist. So, I have been working in the cartoon field since 1986 as a background designer for many companies, in pencil or acrylics, for cartoons for TV such as Ninja Turtles, Fantom 2040, Prince Valiant or Titeuf to name a few...

The Point of Excite by Bernardumaine Secret offering by Bernardumaine No Explanation Necessary by Bernardumaine Cent titres by Bernardumaine

:bulletblack: Is it easy to sell your artworks:

I am glad I have been selling some drawings in foreign countries ( Great Britain and Australia ) because of the Internet, and I sold works in France too, but this occurs very randomly, lots of people are still afraid by Surrealist works, they prefer traditional still life or such...On another hand, drawing , black and white works are less attractive than colored ones. Of course, I am aware of this, but I don't care.

:bulletblack: Do you promote/ sell/ showcase your artworks. If you do, how:

I like a lot to share my work on various sites such as Renderosity, Deviantart, or Facebook. I was lucky to have got some works published because of contacts from those sites : "Digital art for the 21st Century" (Renderosity) 12 digital works published ;  " Metamorphosis" (Jon Beinart) 2 drawings published - and "New visions of Surrealism"( Negoist) one drawing included, came from Deviantart contacts.

:bulletblack: How did the internet influenced your art:

The internet gave me a wider audience and permitted me to get contacts to collaborate under the process of "The exquisite corpse " with international artists. Another change was the possibility to share a work as soon as it got finished, instead of  having a complete series of drawings to do an exhibition.

:bulletblack: Where can people see your artworks:

I am currently participating in a group show at Gallery 56, Memphis, Tennessee and I should exhibit in Abnormals gallery, Berlin (Germany) and Poznan ( Poland) by the end of 2010 ; I might else show some drawings in Paris by the month of September.

:bulletblack: How can people contact you:

b.dumaine@gmail.com

Near Death Experience by Bernardumaine I can't tell by Bernardumaine The Devil's Reach by Bernardumaine